Monthly Archives: April 2015

News from Veeam: Update 2 for Veeam Backup and Replication

The big day is here, which I know many have been waiting for. Since the release of Vmware ESX 6 many have been waiting for an update for Veeam to be able to upgrade to ESX 6.

The update is now available and can be uploaded here –> http://www.veeam.com/blog/veeam-availability-suite-update-2-vsphere-6-support-endpoint-and-more.html

Now this patch also includes integration with Endpoint Backup and support for a bunch of the ESX 6 features such as

  • Support for VMware Virtual Volumes (VVols) and VMware Virtual SAN 2.0
  • Storage Policy-Based Management (SPBM) policy backup and restore
  • Backup and replication of Fault Tolerant (FT) VMs
  • vSphere 6 tags integration
  • Cross-vCenter vMotion awareness
  • Quick Migration to VVols
  • Hot-Add transport mode of SATA virtual disks

And now we can monitor VVOL with Veeam one as well, I have more news about Veeam coming in the horizon stay tuned! Smilefjes

Quick post, Razer Seiren on Windows 10 not working

So recently I just purchased the Razer Seiren for my home enviroment, going to be used for elearning purposes. But one problem was that it was not working on the Windows 10 tech preview. If I looked into device manager I saw that it was an unknown device.

Razer synapse didnt even try to install the device. But you can see the device drivers under the folder C:Program Files (x86)Razer from there you can install the drivers from the 8.1 folder.

Veeam endpoint backup free generally available!

Veeam Endpoint backup free, which allows for backup of physical computer and physical servers which I have blogged about earlier https://msandbu.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/veeam-endpoint-backup-and-integration-with-veeam-br/

https://msandbu.wordpress.com/2014/12/01/veeam-endpoint-backup-a-new-free-backup-solution-for-computers-and-physical-servers/

Has now become generally available from Veeam!

http://www.veeam.com/endpoint-backup-free.html

This can also be integrated with existing Veeam repositories which enabled us to do physical backup from Endpoint backup to a Veeam infrastructure!

Optimizing web content with Citrix Netscaler

This post, is based upon a session I had for a partner in Norway. How can we use Netscaler to optimize web content?

Let’s face it, the trends are chaging

* Users are becoming less patient (meaging that they demand that applications/services respond quicker. (more then 40% of users drop out if the website takes mroe then 5 – 10 seconds to load) think about how that can affect a WebShop or eCommerce site ?

* More and more mobile traffic (Mobile phones, ipads, laptops. Communicating using 3G/4G or WLAN for that matter) and to that we can add that there is more data being sent across the network as well. Site web applications become more and more complex, with more code and more components as well.

* More demands to availability (Users are demaing that services are available at almost every hour. If we think about it about 5 – 10 years ago, if something was down for about 10 min we didn’t think that much about it, but now ?

* More demands to have secure communication. It wasn’t that long ago that Facebook and Google switched to SSL as default when using their services. With more and more hacking attempts happening online it requires a certain amount of security.

So what can Netscaler do in this equation ?

* Optimizing content with Front-end optimization, Caching and Compression

With the latest 10.5 release, Citrix has made a good jump into web content optimization. With features like lazy loading of images, HTML comment removal, minify JS and inline CSS.  And adding it that after content is being optimized the content can be compressed using gZIP or DEFLATE and sent across the wire (NOTE: that most web servers like Apache and IIS support GZIP and Deflate but it is much more efficient to do this on a dedicated ADC)

And with using Caching to store often accessed data it makes the Netscaler a good web optimization platform.

* Optimizing based upon endpoints.

With the current trend and more users connecting using mobile devices which are using the internett with a wireless conenction. If needs a better way to communicate as well. A god example here is TCP congeston. On a wireless you have a higher amount of packet loss and this requires using for instance TCP Congestion Westwood which is much better suites on wireless connections. Also using features like MTCP (on supported devices) allows for higher troughput as well. And that we can place different TCP settings on different services makes it much more agile.

* High availability

Using features like load balancing and GSLB allows us to deliver a high availabilty and scale solution. And using features like AppQOE to allows us to prioritize traffic in a eCommerce setting might be a valuable asset. Think the scenario if we have a web shop, where most of our buying customers come from a regular PC while most mobile users that are connecting are mostly checking the latest offers. If we ever where to reach our peak in traffic it is useful to prioritize traffic based upon endpoint connecting.

* Secure content

With Netscaler it allows us to create specific SSL profile which we can attack to different services. For instance older applications which are used by everyone might not have the high requirement regarding security, but on the other hand PCI-DSS requires a high level of security. Add to the mix that we can handle many common DDoS attacks on TCP level and on HTTP. We can also use Application firewall which handles many application based attacks, when an own learning feature it can block users which are not following the common user pattern on a website. And that we can specify common URLs which users are not allowed to access.

So to summerize, the Netscaler can be a good component to optimizing and securing traffic, with a lot of exiting stuff happening in the next year! Smilefjes stay tuned.

Setting up a secure XenApp enviroment–Storefront

So this is part two of my securing XenApp enviroment, this time I’ve moved my focus to Storefront. Now how does Storefront need to be secured ?

In most cases, Storefront is the aggregator that allows clients to connect to a citrix infrastructure. Im most cases the Storefront is located on the internal network and the Netscaler is placed in DMZ. Even if Storefront is located on the internal network and the firewall and Netscaler does alot of the security work, there are still things that need to be take care of on the Storefront.

In many cases many users also connect to the Storefront directly if they are connected to the internal network. Then they are just bypassing the Netscaler. But since Storefront is a Windows Server there are alot of things to think about.

So where to begin.

1: Setting up a base URL with a HTTPS certificate (if you are using a internal signed certificate make sure that you have a proper set up Root CA which in most cases should be offline. Or that you have a public signed third party CA. Which also in many cases is useful because if users are connecting directly to Storefront their computers might not regonize the internally signed CA.

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2: Remove the HTTP binding on the IIS site. To avoid HTTP requests.

Use a tool like IIS crypto to disable the use of older SSL protocols on IIS server and older RC ciphers

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You can also define ICA file signing. This allows for Citrix Receiver clients which support signed ICA files to verify that the ICA fiels they get comes from a verified source.  http://support.citrix.com/proddocs/topic/dws-storefront-25/dws-configure-conf-ica.html

3: We can also setup so that Citrix Receiver is unable to caching password, this can be done by changing authenticate.aspx under C:inetpubwwwrootCitrixAuthenticationViewsExplicitForms

and you change the following parameter

<% Html.RenderPartial(“SaveCredentialsRequirement”,
              SaveCredentials); %>

<%– Html.RenderPartial(“SaveCredentialsRequirement”,
                SaveCredentials); –%>

4: Force ICA connections to go trough Netscaler using Optimal Gateway feature of Storefront –> http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX200129 using this option will also allow you to use Insight to monitor clients connection to Citrix as well, and depending on the Netscaler version give you some historical data.

And with using Windows pass-trough you can have Kerberos authenticating to the Storefront and then have ICA sessions go trough the Netscaler –> http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX133982

5: Use SSL in communication with the delivery controllers –> http://support.citrix.com/proddocs/topic/xendesktop-7/cds-mng-cntrlr-ssl.html

6: Install Dynamic IP restrictions on the IIS server, this stops DDoS happning against Storefront from the same IP-address

 IIS fig4

7: Windows updated!  and Antivirus software running (Note that having Windows updated, having some sort of antivirus running with limited access to the server) also let the Windows Firewall keep runnign and only open the necessery ports to allow communication with AD, Delivery Controllers and with Netscaler.

8: Define audit policies to log (Credential validation, Remote Desktop connections, terminal logons and so on) https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn319056.aspx

9: Use the Storefront Web Config GUI from Citrix to define lockout and session timeout values

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10: Use a tool like Operations Manager with for instance ComTrade to monitor the Storefront Instances. Or just the IIS management pack for IIS, this gives some good insight on how the IIS server is operating.

11: Make sure that full logging is enabled on the IIS server site.

IIS Logging Configuration for System Center Advisor Log Management

Stay tuned for more, next part is the delivery controllers and the VDA agents.

Netscaler and Office365 SAML iDP setup

With Netscaler 10.5, Citrix announced the support for SAML Identity Provider on the Netscaler feature. That basically meant that we could in theory use the Netscaler as an identity provider for Office365 / Azure AD. Now I have been trying to reverse engineering the setup since Citrix hasen’t created any documentation regarding the setup.

But now! Citrix recently announced the setup of Netscaler iDP setup for Office365 setup http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX200818

Yay!

on another part Citrix also released a new build of Netscaler VPX (build 56.12) which fixes the CPU utilization bug on Vmware you can see more about the release note here –> http://support.citrix.com/article/CTX200818

And there is also a new PCI DSS report which shows compliance for version 3.

Azure Site Recovery Preview setup for Vmware

So a couple of days ago, Microsoft announced the preview for site recovery for physical and Vmware servers. Luckily enough I was able to get access to the preview pretty early. Now for those who don’t know the site recovery feature is built upon the InMage Scout suite that Microsoft purchased a while back. About 6 months back, Microsoft annouced the Migration Accelerator suite which was the first Microsoft branding of InMage but now they have built it into the Microsoft Azure portal, but the architecture is still the same. So this blog will explain how the the different components operate and how it works and how to set it up.

Now there are three different components for a on-premise to Azure replication of virtual machines. There is the

* Configuration Server (Which is this case is Azure VM which is used for centralized management)

* Master Target (User as a repository and for retention, recives the replicated data)

* Process Server (This is the on-premise server which actually does the data moving. It caches data, compresses and encrypts it using a passphrase we create and moves the data to the master target which in turn moves it to Azure.

Now when connecting this to a on-premise site the Process Server will push install the InMage agent on every virtual  machines that it want to protect. The InMage agent will then do a VSS snapshot and move the data to the Process Server which will in turn replicate the data to the master target.

So when you get access to the preview, create a new site recovery vault

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In the dashboard you now have the option to choose between On-premise site with Vmware and Physical computer to Azure

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First we have to deploy the configuration server which the managment plane in Azure. So if we click Deploy Configuration Server this wizard will appear which has a custom image which is uses to deploy a Configuration Server

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This will automatically create an A3 instance, running a custom image (note it might take some time before in appers in the virtual machine pane in Azure)  You can look in the jobs pane of the recovery vault what the status is

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When it is done you can go into the virtual machine pane and connect to the Configuration Manager server using RDP. When in the virtual machine run the setup which is located on the desktop

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When setting up the Confguration Manager component it requires the vault registration key (Which is downloadable from the Site Recovery dashboard)

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Note when the configuration manager server component is finished innstalling it wil present you with a passphrase. COPY IT!! Since you will use it to connect the other components.

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Now when this is done the server should appear in the Site Recovery under servers as a configuration manager server

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Next we need to deploy a master target server. This will also deploy in Azure (and will be a A4 machine with a lot of disk capaticy

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(The virtual machine will have an R: drive where it stores retention data) it is about 1TB large.

The same goes here, it will generate a virtual machine which will eventually appear in the virtual machine pane in Azure, when it is done connect to it using RDP, it will start a presetup which will generate a certificate which allows for the Process serer to connect to it using HTTPS

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Then when running the wizard it will ask for the IP-address (internal on the same vNet) for the configuration manager server and the passphrase. In my case I had the configuration manager server on 10.0.0.10 and the master server on 10.0.0.15. After the master server is finished deployed take note of the VIP and the endpoints which are attached to it.

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Now that we are done with the Azure parts of it we need to install a process server. Download the bits from the azure dashboard and install it on a Windows Server (which has access to vCenter)

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Enter the VIP of the Cloud service and don’t change the port. Also we need to enter the passphrase which was generated on the Configuration Manager server.

Now after the installastion is complete it will ask you to download the Vmware CLI binares from Vmware

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Now this is for 5.1 (but I tested it against a vSphere 5.5 vcenter and it worked fine) the only pieces it uses the CLI binaries for are to discover virtual machines on vCenter. Rest of the job is using agents on the virtual machines.

Now that we are done with the seperate components they should appear in the Azure portal. Go into the recovery vault, servers –> Configuration manager server and click on it and properties.

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Now we should see that the different servers are working. image

Next we need to add a vCenter server from the server dashboard.

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Add the credentials and IP-adress and choose what Process Server is to be used to connect to the on-premise vCenter server.

After that is done and the vCenter appears under servers and connected you can create a protection group (and then we add virtual machines to it)

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Specify the thresholds and retention time for the virtual machines that are going to be in the protection group.

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Next we we need to add virtual machines to the group

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Then choose from vCenter what virtual machines to want to protect

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Then you need to specify which resources are going to be used to repllicate the target VM to Azure

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And of course administrator credentials to remote push the InMage mobility agent to the VM

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After that the replication will begin

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And you can see that on the virtual machine that the InMage agent is being installed.

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And note that the replication might take some time depending on the type of bandwidth available.